At What Age Should Children Begin Piano Lessons?

I get asked this question A LOT.

It depends who you ask but most people begin to think about starting children in piano lessons between the age of 4-8 years of age. It is a good idea to consider the child, their level of interest and their fine motor development. Music lessons can help develop memory, creativity, self-discipline and self-confidence. Lessons can be beneficial for developing literacy, numeracy, and fine motor skills.

One of the benefits to starting early is children can learn quickly and will retain what they’ve learned later in life, especially if they start before the age of 10.

The key is to keep things fun and joyful. Your child must get satisfaction from playing. If getting the child to the instrument is a chore, it might be the wrong choice. Finding a teacher who is skilled in music but also understands child development is important.

Percussion instruments can be a great place to start for a young child.

If a child cannot yet move fingers independently, it could be too early to start. See if your child can place a hand on the table and tap one finger at a time. If this is a struggle, then wait a bit.

Generally, I accept children who are 6 years of age and up for piano lessons and I expect them to practice at home in between weekly lessons.

A music class with movement, games and singing could be more suitable for children who are 3-6 years. The social part of learning in a group reinforcing. And if children catch on to the joy of music at an early age, they will be more interested in learning instruments as they get older.

You can check out this post by Liberty Park Music for more information on learning other instruments and when to start.

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Promoting Physical Activity for Children

A Western University study suggests children attending child care may not be getting enough vigorous heart-pumping activity. In British Columbia, child care centres are now required to have an Active Play Plan to address this issue.

Research indicates that when outdoors, children are 10 times more active than indoors so getting children outside is the first step. Outdoor play has been associated with improved self-confidence. Read more here.

Lack of activity destroys the good condition of every human being, while movement and methodical physical exercise save it and preserve it.”
-Plato

Based on my observations, there are some children who are less likely to naturally engage in physical activity and may need extra encouragement to get active. I do believe if we find the thing we love and feel successful with, we will participate. This is true for children and adults.

What barriers are there to ensuring children are engaging in physical activity? How can we overcome those barriers? Let’s talk about it!